Coronavirus Pandemic, covid-19, Everyday life and critical diversities, Social Inequalities and Social Ordering

Migrant families, Covid-19 travel restrictions, and everyday bordering

By Maria Teresa Ferazzoli and Julie Walsh  In the early days of the pandemic, many countries closed their borders to stop the spread of COVID-19. International travel has continued to be restricted, but with changing caveats, including ‘essential’ travel only, restrictions on travellers from particular countries, and the introduction of vaccination ‘passports’. Most recently, borders… Continue reading Migrant families, Covid-19 travel restrictions, and everyday bordering

Everyday life and critical diversities, Social Inequalities and Social Ordering

Beyond Gender Wars and Institutional Panics: Recognising Gender Diversity in UK Higher Education

By Sally Hines According to the UK’s media, academia is currently plagued by ‘silencing’, ‘no-platforming’, and ‘cancel culture’ amidst the Nation’s ‘gender wars’. Over the last year, barely a week has gone by without a broadsheet newspaper article, radio discussion programme, or TV report suggesting that UK Higher Education (HE) has reached crisis point in… Continue reading Beyond Gender Wars and Institutional Panics: Recognising Gender Diversity in UK Higher Education

Everyday life and critical diversities, Social Inequalities and Social Ordering

Is it still relevant to talk about deinstitutionalisation on World Mental Health Day?

By Maria Teresa Ferazzoli Campaigns like Let's talk have worked to reduce the stigma around mental health issues and helped to raise awareness about the importance of asking for help. However, there is still limited attention given to the experiences of people affected by severe and chronic mental illness.  Present western mental health care systems… Continue reading Is it still relevant to talk about deinstitutionalisation on World Mental Health Day?

Social Inequalities and Social Ordering

Sargol: The ‘Get Fat Quick’ Scam

By Lauren O'Hagan In contemporary society, the idealisation of thinness and the denigration of fatness have become dominant cultural ideals and are now the reference model to which men and women aspire when caring for their bodies. This “cult of thinness” is intensified by social media, which promotes a homogenised body standard that is unattainable… Continue reading Sargol: The ‘Get Fat Quick’ Scam